Hang Dry Your Clothes

A couple years ago while visiting friends in Melbourne, Australia, I had some downtime so I decided to do some laundry. After the washing was done, I noticed there was no dryer. Oh, looks like I’m using a clothesline for the first time since childhood. I still get grief from my Aussie friends regarding North Americans’ use of dryers. In Canada, we don’t have the luxury of drying clothes outside all year round, but you can hang them inside during the winter as your house will be very dry (for those of us in Southeastern Ontario, anyways).

There are a huge number of benefits for such a simple task:

  1. Less damaging to your clothing [Lint is your clothing degrading]
  2. Wash Less! [Okay, so it’s labour intensive to dry everything. Only wash when dirty!]
  3. Better for the environment! [No electricity required!]
  4. No electricity required so it’s free! [No electricity or coin dryer cost]
  5. Humidify your house! [In the winter the added moisture will keep you healthier]
  6. Get outside! [Enjoy a few minutes outside; we all can use it]

Try it! More money in your pocket and better for the environment; it’s a double win!

-Mike

 

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Documentary: Slomo

I came across this documentary on Slomo, a man who took back his life from the poorly named ‘American Dream’. By his own choices, Slomo stumbled upon his meaning of freedom and life satisfaction after significant hardship. Listening to him talk about his new found freedom and life is inspiring, and I am glad I discovered a sense of what I want in life. Not everything is clear yet, but I see a light in the distance and I’m working my way there. Enjoy!

-Mike

The Cost of Minimalism

I’ve seen a lot of articles lately talking about how minimalism is only something afforded to the rich. I see where these authors are coming from. When you’re poor, you’re not minimal by ‘choice’. When you’re rich, you can be minimal by ‘choice’. Rich people also have the circumstances to afford sleek minimal furniture, durable clothes to keep a minimal wardrobe, etc.

I would argue against this, however. The more effort one puts in, the better results they’ll get from their minimalism. While thrift shopping I’ve managed to pickup durable t-shirts and clothing that is ‘Made In Canada’. In my short life, I don’t think I’ve ever seen a t-shirt in a retail store that is made in Canada. Now I own a wardrobe made up of robust pieces, that I only wash when they’re dirty or smelly, and hang dry to increase longevity.

By spending more time hunting down sales, checking prices, thinking through purchases, I’ll be able to save a lot of money. Alternately, this money may not going into monetary instruments, but be invested into higher quality needs (a new pair of winter boots, for instance).

I haven’t come up with a good way to quantify how much money I am saving by my new found passion and lifestyle, but I am sure in the long term it will benefit my mentality and my wallet. Minimalism, to me, is more than just saving money. The mental benefits it brings me are far more valuable and I believe you should do things that make you happy first and foremost.

Regardless of what your lifestyle is, move with intent, and think before you spend.

-Mike

Documentary: Without Bound

One way you could describe early retirement is that it is an alternate lifestyle. That is, a lifestyle different from what is normal. Vandwelling is another alternative lifestyle. It is a fascinating, unique, and beautiful lifestyle in my opinion and if you haven’t heard of it, I urge you to look it up.

Whether you’ve heard of van dwelling, vannin’, overlanding, van living or not, you should give this documentary a watch. I won’t go into much detail, other than what you’re about to see is an incredible example of human nature, living life, and freedom. Enjoy!

-Mike