Chopsticks: The Best Utensil

To preface this, I didn’t grow up using chopsticks. I learned how to use them so that I could eat sushi and Korean BBQ. Also, I still don’t hold them properly. What I can say though, is they are the most versatile utensil out there.

With a pair of chopsticks, I can cook and eat a dish of just about anything. When I’m done cooking, a simple rinse and wipe of each stick results in clean chopsticks ready to eat the final product. Typically, one requires cooking tools (flipper, spoons, whatever) to prepare the dish, a fork to eat it, and perhaps a spoon too. Chopsticks seem to accomplish it all.

Imagine if instead of having a cutlery drawer, with an organizer, and 8 sets of 2 spoons, 2 forks, and a knife; you just had 8 pairs of chopsticks. As someone looking to reduce stuff in the junk drawer, this is a great way to eliminate about 40 pieces of silverware I seldom use.

If you’re fortunate enough to have not loaded up your kitchen yet, or haven’t purchased anything at all, get a good knife and a pair of chopsticks and see how you make out!

-Mike

Documentary: Without Bound

One way you could describe early retirement is that it is an alternate lifestyle. That is, a lifestyle different from what is normal. Vandwelling is another alternative lifestyle. It is a fascinating, unique, and beautiful lifestyle in my opinion and if you haven’t heard of it, I urge you to look it up.

Whether you’ve heard of van dwelling, vannin’, overlanding, van living or not, you should give this documentary a watch. I won’t go into much detail, other than what you’re about to see is an incredible example of human nature, living life, and freedom. Enjoy!

-Mike

Budget Optimization

There are a million and one talking points on budget optimization, but I found a metric that works really well for me. When you’re travelling, you often look at what day-to-day costs are for your trip, because it is typically measured in days. When you live somewhere, you usually look at it in months, because that’s how bills are paid.

I’m challenging you to look at what your current life costs you per day, it should give you a unique perspective. Until recently, living in Toronto costs me about $48/day. I think that’s pretty high, so I found ways to get that down to $45, and hopefully I’ll have it below $40 in the next 6 months by moving.

Look at all of your required expenses, and determine if you can reduce or eliminate any of them WITHOUT giving up anything you love. Myself, I dropped a couple domain names I haven’t used in over a year, got rid of my gym membership, reduced my meat and cheese consumption, and stopped buying lotto tickets. This got me to my goal. $3/day seems trivial, but that’s over $1000/year!

Try slimming down, you’ll feel better!

-Mike