Let Other People Pay For Your Stuff!

You might be asking, why would someone else pay for your stuff? Well, the more common term would be ‘buying things used’. When you buy an item used, another person has put up the money for the immediate drop in value. Even selling an item new and in the package, you won’t get retail price for it. Some things you don’t always buy used, but things like clothing, dishes, cookware are easy to visually inspect.

If you’re moving out for the first time, you’re going to save a TONNE of money buying used. If you’re a single person, you can probably get by with 1-4 dining sets. Don’t bother with a 16 person plate set unless you host people frequently. Otherwise you’ll find yourself using the same plate over and over again; never making it to the bottom of your pile of plates. That, my friends, is what we call a waste of money.

You stand to save a lot of money on clothing as well. Typically, items you find used at thrift shops are in great shape, sometimes never worn, and they’re higher quality products. An H&M t-shirt never lasts long enough to make it to the thrift store racks. I’ve managed to buy brand new, white, Fruit of the Loom t-shirts that are MADE IN CANADA for $3-5. Where can you buy clothing made in Canada for that price?

Electronics can be hit or miss. Do your due diligence though and you can score a great deal. I recently sold my television because I’m moving. Someone got an amazing panel with little use for $150 less than retail. I got a really good deal on it during boxing, and definitely got my my money’s worth, but they got a steal as far as I’m concerned.

Before you buy anything, ask yourself, can I buy it used?

-Mike

Advertisements

My Early Retirement Ecosystem

I’ve thought a lot about the symbiosis of so many of my alternative living strategies, and figured I would try and talk about the ecosystem and how it all works. Some of the main strategies that compliment each other:

  • Early Retirement
  • Bring Frugal
  • Minimalism
  • Healthy Eating
  • Reduced Meat Diet
  • Zero Waste
  • DIY

My main goal is early retirement, and I will do anything to get there. One of the biggest boosts you’ll get towards financial freedom is becoming frugal. Spending less means saving more; plain and simple. Once the frugal addiction hits, you’ll enjoy finding out how much junk you used to buy, and then not buying it. Literally not spending money makes me happy! Cool, right? Being frugal to me is about not spending money on the things you don’t want to spend money on. That being said..

I personally don’t need a lot of space. I’ve slowly reduce the amount of stuff I physically have and am looking to reduce the space I need. I started my adult life in a large condo with all the trimmings. Recently, I then into an apartment to reduce my rent and expenditures. Next, I will be moving into a room in a shared house. My next move will reduce my costs significantly (almost 40% for housing). I’ve gotten to a point where I don’t have anything else I need to rid myself of. I have become MY version of minimal.

I really enjoy food and cooking but I don’t think anyone enjoys paying their grocery bill. The thing I quickly learned about myself after moving out on my own is how much I enjoy cooking. I started off simple with a couple recipes and now I have a good sized repertoire. One of things about cooking that has improved my food and my diet immensely is moving to raw materials. Raw materials are cheaper, result in better tasting food, and reduce all of the ‘junk’ that processed foods contain.

In Canada, food is fairly expensive and meat and cheese are very expensive. As a result, I have moved to a mainly meat free diet. When I do eat meat, I put more work into cheaper cuts and have been very impressed by the results. This saves me money, expands my skills, and has me eating more environmentally friendly dishes. When I go shopping for produce, I bring refillable bags and NEVER buy plastic bags at the checkout.

A zero waste lifestyle is directly related to being frugal, eating healthy, being more environmentally friendly, and eating less meat. Meat comes in foam trays, if I buy meat, I reuse the trays at least once to make them more than single use, for example. I buy only seasonal produce and put it in reusable mesh bags.

Before I buy anything, I always ask myself: Can I get by without it? Can make it myself? I have become extremely self sufficient and, if I don’t say so myself, quite handy. I walk to work/my friends/the train/the store. I carry all of my groceries in a backpack. When organizing work events, I pickup the food and alcohol myself. I repair my own things. I hunt down deals and buy used when I do need things. I learn new skills. This is a huge requirement if you want more freedom. Stop paying people to do things you can do yourself!

This was a bit of a rant, but look at ways your different passions compliment each other, and find new ways to enhance your lifestyle.

-Mike